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Authors Posts by Cindi Hobbes

Cindi Hobbes

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Wednesday, July 21, 2021 — 2:00 pm ET
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For black and indigenous people of color (BIPOC) Mental Health Awareness Month, Magellan is offering a free webinar with their medical directors, Dr. Rakel Beall-Wilkins, MD, MPH, psychiatrist, and Dr. Misty Tu, MD, psychiatrist, as they share their knowledge and tips to support BIPOC mental health and answer questions from the audience.

Course Description: 
Impacts from the pandemic have disproportionately affected BIPOC groups, leading to increased stress and mental health concerns. While African Americans make up 13% of the U.S. population, they make up 30% of COVID-19 cases and 33% of COVID-19 hospitalizations [1]. Data shows that COVID-19-related deaths among BIPOC groups are also disproportionately higher [1]. Among Hispanic adults during the pandemic, reports of increased or newly initiated substance use (SU) was 36.9%, compared to 14.3%–15.6% among all other respondents, symptoms of depression were reported 59% more frequently than by White individuals, and reports of suicidal thoughts/ideation were 4x higher than for African American and White individuals [2]. Among Asian Americans during the pandemic, 32% have reported fear over being threatened or physically attacked, 45% have reported at least one derogatory incident tied to racial or ethnic background, and 81% have reported a general concern that violence against them is increasing [3].

Historically, individuals in racial and ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive treatment for mental health or SU disorders [2]. Among people with any mental illness in 2015, 22% of Asian people and 31% of African American and Hispanic people received treatment, compared to 48% of White people [4].

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Patient Selection and Neurosurgical Decision-Making to Treat Hypertonia in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Who is a Good Candidate and Which Procedures are Helpful?  

Thursday, August 5, 2021
1:00 pm–2:00 pm EDT, 12:00 pm–1:00 pm CDT
11:00 am–12:00 pm MDT, 10:00 am–11:00 am PDT

Dr. Marcie Ward, Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
Dr. Patrick Graupman, Pediatric Neurosurgery
Dr. Tim Feyma, Pediatric Neurology
Laura Area, PT, Pediatric Physical Therapy

Course Description:
Management of hypertonicity in children with cerebral palsy is multifaceted. Join us as this multi-disciplinary team from Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul, Minnesota discusses the neurosurgical options, considerations, and best practices for treatment of this condition.

Disclosures/Conflicts of Interest:
The presentation team are all employed by Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare and did not receive any compensation for this presentation. The team has no relevant financial disclosures.

Objectives: At the end of the session, the learner will:

  • Describe the history of surgical rhizotomy and other surgical treatments which guide the application procedures in current clinical practice;
  • Understand the importance of careful patient selection for surgical procedures based on patient and family goals, neuroanatomy principles, and the predictability of outcomes; and
  • Identify atypical patient presentations that may benefit from selective dorsal rhizotomy and other procedures and discuss anticipated outcomes.

Audience: This webinar is intended for all members of the rehabilitation team, including medical staff, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, licensed psychologists, mental health professionals, and other interested professionals.

Level: Intermediate

Certificate of Attendance: Certificates of attendance are available for all attendees. No CEs are provided for this course.

Registration: Registration is complimentary for members of IPRC/RCPA. Registration fee for non-members is $179. Not a member yet? Consider joining today. Multiple registrations per organization are permitted.

REGISTER here.

Thursday, June 17, 2021
12:00 pm–1:00 pm EDT, 11:00 am–12:00 pm CDT,
10:00 am–11:00 am MDT, 9:00 am–10:00 am PDT

Olga Morozova, MD

Instructor Bio:
Dr. Olga Morozova is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and at Children’s National Hospital, where she serves as the Director of Education and Fellowship in the Division of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine. Dr. Morozova received her medical degree from the Second State Medical Institute of Moscow and completed her residency and fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University and Kennedy Krieger Institute. She is board certified by the American Board of PM&R in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and in Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine. She practices pediatric rehabilitation medicine at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, DC.

Dr. Morozova is a Fellow of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and American Academy of Pediatrics and is a member of the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine. Dr. Morozova is co-founder and co-director of Perinatal Brain Injury Clinic at Children’s National. Her professional interest is in improvement of functional abilities of children with cerebral palsy and other childhood onset disabilities. She has presented nationally and internationally and authored multiple papers and book chapters on various topics within pediatric rehabilitation.

Couse Description:
In recent years, advances in pre-natal and neo-natal medicine have facilitated greater survival rates for neonates born prematurely and/or with special health needs. Following a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit stay, these infants are often referred for therapeutic services in acute rehab, outpatient, and early intervention settings. This course discusses important information for providers working with infants and neonates along the rehabilitation continuum of care. The information presented will equip the provider to assist infants and their families to maximize functional and therapeutic outcomes.

Disclosures/Conflicts of Interest:
Dr. Morozova is employed by Children’s National Hospital and did not receive any compensation for this presentation. Dr. Morozova has no relevant financial disclosures.

Objectives: At the end of the session the learner will:

  • Recognize the importance of early identification of high risk NICU graduates.
  • Describe methodologies, disciplines, and assessment tools for neurodevelopmental evaluation of NICU graduates.
  • Discuss recommendations for specific therapeutic interventions and referrals to optimize outcomes for NICU graduates and their families.

Audience: This webinar is intended for all members of the rehabilitation team, including medical staff, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, licensed psychologists, mental health professionals, and other interested professionals.

Level: Intermediate

Certificate of Attendance: Certificates of attendance are available for all attendees.

Continuing Education Credits: This course has been submitted for 0.1 Pennsylvania PT CEU (1 Contact Hour). Individuals seeking CE credit must register for and log into the course individually so that attendance can be confirmed.

Registration: Registration is complimentary for members of IPRC/RCPA. Registration fee for non-members is $179. Not a member yet? Consider joining today. Multiple registrations per organization are permitted; however, any attendee requesting PT CEU credit must register and log in individually in order to verify attendance.

Register here today.

Thursday, May 20, 2021
12:00 pm–1:00 pm EDT, 11:00 am–12:00 pm CDT, 10:00 am–11:00 am MDT, 9:00 am–10:00 am PDT

Tasha Perkins Holmes, MOT, OTR/L

Instructor Bio:

Tasha Perkins Holmes, MOT, OTR/L holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and her graduate degree in Occupational Therapy from Nova Southeastern University. She is an experienced clinician with over 16 years of clinical experience.

Tasha has worked in a variety of settings and with different age groups, ranging from pediatrics to geriatrics. Tasha has a special interest in school-based service provision, particularly using the teletherapy service delivery model. In this role, she has provided school-based OT services nationally and internationally. In addition to direct treatment services, Tasha also has experience teaching at the collegiate level as an instructor in the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program at Central Piedmont Community College.

Tasha is passionate about health equity and the impact of bias on the care delivered and received and has created and delivered content on Diversity and Health Care for national continuing education providers such as OccupationalTherapy.com. Tasha’s interest in this topic has grown and evolved as a health care consumer, a health care provider, and as a woman of color. As a clinician working in a diverse community, she shares her experience and perspective to improve access, service delivery, and the health care experience for pediatric clients and their families.

Objectives: At the end of the session the learner will:

  • Identify barriers to health care provision in diverse populations.
  • Describe ways to be more inclusive when providing health care services.
  • Discuss benefits of providing inclusive health care services.

Audience: This webinar is intended for all members of the rehabilitation team, including medical staff, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, licensed psychologists, mental health professionals, and other interested professionals.

Level: Intermediate

Certificate of Attendance: Certificates of attendance are available for all attendees. No CEUs are provided for this session.

Registration: Registration is complimentary for members of IPRC/RCPA. Registration fee for non-members is $179. Not a member yet? Consider joining today. Multiple registrations per organization are permitted. Register here to participate.

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Written by Andrea Ward, PT, DPT and Christine Koterba, PhD

Advocacy defined is: “any action that speaks in favor of, recommends, argues for a cause, supports or defends, or pleads on behalf of others.” It happens on behalf of the children and families we serve each and every day in big and small ways at IPRC member organizations. The IPRC Education & Advocacy Committee shares member stories to celebrate these efforts and inspire others.

Children’s Specialized Hospital (CSH), an RWJBarnabas Health Facility, is committed to placing children and their families at the center of all that they do. With 14 locations across New Jersey, CSH provides inpatient and outpatient care for children with special health challenges. The hospital’s commitment to patient and family advocacy is evident through the practice of Patient-and Family-Centered Care (PFCC), involving families in every aspect of the organization.

Two of the ways PFCC principles are put into practice at CSH are: through the addition of Family Faculty (FF) to their staff and the creation and sustainment of the Family Advisory Council (FAC).

FF are parents or caregivers of children previously or currently receiving services at CSH. They listen, provide insight, and encourage positive communication, partnering with families and staff to facilitate respectful and productive relationships. FF support families whenever they need them: through medical and therapy appointments, during rounds on the unit, even in the outpatient waiting areas and lobby. In addition, FF share resources, maintain a resource center, lead workshops, develop and review communication materials, and provide input on all hospital policies and procedures. They sit side by side with board members, hospital leadership, and staff on all CSH boards, committees, and task forces.

Elizabeth Marcketta, a member of both FF and the FAC, describes her role as empowering and encouraging families and caregivers to be strong advocates for their own children. Through her role, she meets with families, provides support and resources, and empowers them to be advocates for their children. Elizabeth often reminds caregivers: you are the expert on your child.”

The Family Advisory Council is comprised of representatives from hospital leadership, hospital staff from key clinical and non-clinical areas, and families who currently or previously received services at CSH. FAC members provide input and family perspective for policies and practices, and support the organization’s strategic initiatives to ensure that the highest quality of care is provided. Elizabeth shares, “It’s an honor to be part of the Family Faculty team and to know [that] the experiences I have had with my children placed me in a position to help other patients, families, and staff at Children’s Specialized Hospital.”

The Family Faculty are uniquely positioned to advocate on behalf of the needs of the children and families served by CSH. The IPRC Education & Advocacy Committee recognizes this fantastic team and CSH for its commitment to keeping the needs of the children they serve the top priority.

The FAC created a series of safety videos highlighting the partnership between patients, families and staff to provide a safe environment for care. View one of these safety videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJPO54mgado

Learn more about Patient-and Family-Centered Care at Children’s Specialized Hospital:

We’d love to hear about advocacy work happening at other IPRC member organizations! To share your advocacy story, contact Cindi Hobbes.