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Tags Posts tagged with "comprehensive care for joint replacement"

comprehensive care for joint replacement

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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced in the May 19, 2017 Federal Register, that they will again delay the final rule that implements three new Medicare Parts A and B episode payment models (EPMs), the cardiac rehabilitation incentive payment model, as well as changes to the existing comprehensive care for joint replacement (CCJR) model. The delay in the CCJR regulation amendments will allow CMS to maintain and align policy changes with the EPMs. The final rule will now become effective on January 1, 2018.

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In the March 21, 2017 Federal Register, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published an interim final rule with comment period (IFC) to again delay the effective date of the final rule (originally published in the January 3, 2017 Federal Register), implementing the three new Medicare Parts A and B episode payment models, changes to the existing Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) Model, and the Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive model. The effective date has been delayed from March 21 to May 20. According to the interim final rule, the delay is necessary to allow time for additional review. The new payment models and the updated CJR Model allow clinicians additional opportunities to qualify for a five percent incentive payment through the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM) path under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) and the Quality Payment Program.

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On December 20, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the release of a final rule that will implement three new Medicare Parts A and B episode payment models, a Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive Payment model and modifications to the existing Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model under Section 1115A of the Social Security Act.

The finalization of these new Innovation Center models will continue the shift of Medicare payments from rewarding quantity to rewarding quality by creating incentives for hospitals to deliver better care to patients at a lower cost. The models will reward hospitals that work together with physicians and other providers to avoid complications, prevent hospital readmissions, and speed recovery.

The announcement finalizes significant new policies that:

  • Improve orthopedic care: One new payment model will support clinicians in providing care to patients who receive surgery after a hip fracture, other than hip replacement. In addition, CMS is finalizing updates to the CJR Model, which began in April 2016.
  • Improve cardiac care: Three new payment models will support clinicians in providing care to patients who receive treatment for heart attacks, heart surgery to bypass blocked coronary arteries, or cardiac rehabilitation following a heart attack or heart surgery.
  • Provides an accountable care organization (ACO) opportunity for small practices: The new Medicare ACO Track 1+ Model will have more limited downside risk than Tracks 2 or 3 of the Medicare Shared Savings Program in order to encourage more practices, especially small practices, to advance to performance-based risk.

The final rule makes several modest adjustments to the CJR Model that are largely conforming changes for consistency with the other episode payment models. These include refinements for use of the skilled nursing facility waiver, exclusion of beneficiaries participating in selected ACOs, and revising target pricing methodology to include reconciliation and repayment amounts for performance years 3, 4, and 5. CMS is finalizing revisions to the quality adjustment to incorporate improvement as well as absolute performance, and also finalized changes to align CJR with the episode payment models around financial arrangements and beneficiary engagement incentives, compliance enforcement, appeals processes, and beneficiary notifications.

The final rule is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on January 3, 2017, and is effective on February 18, 2017.

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In July 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed new bundled payment models to shift Medicare payments from rewarding quantity to rewarding quality by creating strong incentives for hospitals and clinicians to deliver better care to patients at a lower cost. These proposed new bundled payment models focus on heart attacks, heart bypass surgery, and hip fracture surgery, and would reward hospitals that work together with physicians and other providers to avoid complications, prevent hospital readmissions, and speed recovery. This proposal follows the implementation of the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CCJR) Model that began earlier this year which introduced bundled payments for certain hip and knee replacements.

CMS just released the second annual evaluation report for Models 2–4 of the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) Initiative, which include both retrospective and prospective bundled payments that may or may not include the acute inpatient hospital stay for a given episode of care. This report describes the characteristics of the participants and includes quantitative results from the first year of the initiative. Key highlights include:

  • 11 out of the 15 clinical episode groups analyzed showed potential savings to Medicare. Future evaluation reports will have more data to analyze individual clinical episodes within these and additional groups;
  • Orthopedic surgery under Model 2 hospitals showed statistically significant savings of $864 per episode while showing improved quality as indicated by beneficiary surveys. Beneficiaries who received their care at participating hospitals indicated that they had greater improvement after 90 days post-discharge in two mobility measures than beneficiaries treated at comparison hospitals; and
  • Cardiovascular surgery episodes under Model 2 hospitals did not show any savings yet but quality of care was preserved. Over the next year, we will have significantly more data available, enabling CMS to better estimate effects on costs and quality.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a proposed rule in the August 2, 2016 Federal Register that proposes to implement three new Medicare Parts A and B episode payment models under section 1115A of the Social Security Act, which are meant to improve quality and lower cost. The proposed rule includes a new mandatory bundled payment model for cardiac care in 98 geographical markets for patients who have a heart attack or undergo bypass surgery. The rule would also extend the existing bundled payment model for hip and knee replacements – the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement model – to include hip and femur surgeries. Also proposed are new incentive payments designed to increase the use of cardiac rehabilitation. Additionally, new pathways are outlined for physicians participating in bundled payment models to qualify for payment incentives under the proposed Quality Payment Program, which implements the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). CMS issued a fact sheet to provide more detailed information on the key provisions of this proposed rule. Comments are due by October 3, 2016.

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On July 14, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a proposed rule in the Federal Register, announcing the implementation of a new Medicare Part A and B payment model called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CCJR) model. Under this model, acute care hospitals in 75 selected geographic areas would receive retrospective bundled payments for episodes of care for lower extremity joint replacement or reattachment of a lower extremity. All related care within 90 days of hospital discharge from the joint replacement procedures will be included in the episode of care.

CMS anticipates the proposed CCJR model would benefit Medicare beneficiaries by improving the coordination and transition of care, improving the coordination of items and services paid through Medicare fee-for-service, encouraging more provider investment in infrastructure and redesigned care process for higher quality and more efficient service delivery, and incentivizing higher value care across the inpatient and post-acute care spectrum spanning the episode of care. According to CMS, hip and knee replacements are the most common inpatient surgery for Medicare beneficiaries and can require lengthy recovery and rehabilitation periods.

CMS proposes to test CCJR for a five year performance period, beginning January 1, 2016, and ending December 31, 2020. Comments will be accepted on the proposals contained in the proposed rule, as well as other alternatives or suggestions, through September 8. Contact Melissa Dehoff at RCPA with questions.